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Invented Poetry Forms:

  bullet   The 7/5 Trochee
  bullet   A L'Arora
  bullet   Alliterisen
  bullet   The Alouette
  bullet   The Blitz Poem
  bullet   The Brevette
  bullet   Cascade
  bullet   Christ-in-a-Rhyme
  bullet   CinqTroisDecaLa
  bullet   Clarity Pyramid
  bullet   Constanza
  bullet   Con-Verse
  bullet   The Compound Word Verse
  bullet   Decuain
  bullet   Diatelle
  bullet   Duo-rhyme
  bullet   Epulaeryu
  bullet   Essence
  bullet   The Florette
  bullet   The Florette #2
  bullet   Grá Reformata
  bullet   Jeffreys Sonnet
  bullet   Joseph's Star
  bullet   Harrisham Rhyme
  bullet   HexSonnetta
  bullet   Inverted Refrain
  bullet   LaCharta
  bullet   LaJemme
  bullet   La'libertas
  bullet   Lannet
  bullet   La'ritmo
  bullet   LaíTuin
  bullet   Lauranelle
  bullet   Lento
  bullet   Licentia Rhyme Form
  bullet   Line Messaging
  bullet   Loop Poetry
  bullet   Mini-monoverse
  bullet   Memento
  bullet   The Mirror Sestet
  bullet   Mirrored Refrain
  bullet   Monchielle
  bullet   Monotetra
  bullet   Musette
  bullet   Nove Otto
  bullet   Octameter
  bullet   Octain Refrain
  bullet   Octelle
  bullet   Oddquain
  bullet   Paradelle
  bullet   Parallelogram de Crystalline
  bullet   The Pictorial
  bullet   Pleiades
  bullet   Puente
  bullet   Quadrilew
  bullet   RemyLa Rhyme Form
  bullet   Rictameter
  bullet   Shadow Sonnet
  bullet   Spiritís Vessel
  bullet   Staccato
  bullet   Swap Quatrain
  bullet   Synchronicity
  bullet   The Tableau
  bullet   Tri-fall
  bullet   Trijan Refrain
  bullet   Trilonnet
  bullet   Trinet
  bullet   Triquain
  bullet   Triquatrain
  bullet   Triquint
  bullet   Trois-par-Huit
  bullet   Trolaan
  bullet   Vers Beaucoup
  bullet   Villonnet
  bullet   Wrapped Refrain
  bullet   Wrapped Refrain #2
  bullet   ZaniLa Rhyme
 

Quadrilew

Created by C. G. V. Lewis, the Quadrilew is a form of quatrain poem with an abab rhyming scheme, repeating lines, and contains an alternating syllable structure.

In the first verse, the poet may either start with a five or six syllable line. If the choice is five then the 'sounding' syllable count is (and opposite if the count is six):

VERSE ONE,
Line 1, 5 syllables.
Line 2, 6 syllables.
Line 3, 5 syllables.
Line 4, 6 syllables.

VERSE TWO,
Line 1, (which is a REPEAT of line 2 of the FIRST verse) has 6 syllables.
Line 2 new line of 5 syllables
Line 3 new line of 6 syllables
Line 4 new line of 5 syllables.

VERSE THREE,
Line 1, (which is a REPEAT of line 3 of the first verse) has 5 syllables.
Line 2 new line of 6 syllables.
Line 3 new line of 5 syllables.
Line 4 new line of 6 syllables.

VERSE FOUR,
Line 1, (which is a REPEAT of line 4 of the first verse) has 6 syllables.
Line 2 new line of 5 syllables.
Line 3 new line of 6 syllables.
Line 4 new line of 5 syllables.

If the first line of verse one has 6 syllables then the pattern is
Verse 1, 6565,
Verse 2, 5656,
Verse 3, 6565,
Verse 4 5656: (the rhyme pattern still being abab.)

If wishing to create a longer poem then the next verse (5) must be a completely fresh set of four lines, these being used as before in the following three verses. Etcetera, etcetera.


Example:
Voice

Without one to hear
one may as well be dumb:
please, listen my Dear
as I give my thoughts tongue.

One may as well be dumb
if not allowed speech,
so now, leave your work, come
and I'll of love teach.

Please listen my Dear
to all that I impart
and you will see clear
to the love in my heart.

As I give my thoughts tongue
you will realise
that, if a song's not sung
more than the tune dies.

-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Your love is the bow;
come, play this violin,
so the music flows:
the sweet pavane begins.

Come, play this violin
so in tune with you,
caress each trembling string;
draw each note so true.

So the music flows
beneath your loving hand,
slow the passion grows
to a crescendo grand.

The sweet pavane begins
with its gentle glide;
faster then the dance swings:
a tempestuous tide!

 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Now the music dies,
only echoes remain;
soft and loving sighs
say, we will dance again.

Only echoes remain
of those notes so high,
now there's a new refrain,
it's love's lullaby.

Soft and loving sighs,
no Tarantella thrill;
violin hushed, lies
quiet, the bow now is still.

Say we will dance again
my own Capella;
to the pavane's slow strain
and Tarantella.

Copyright © 2006 C. G. V. Lewis A.K.A. Salmagundi


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